From LB: Marvin Siegel’s estate dips by 5 million within a few years of being in probate court guardianship

MaryGSykes.com

One attorney was billing $200k per year to this estate!
This is horrible and has to end!

ISOLATE, MEDICATE, LIQUIDATE: How to Fleece a Senior

Warning to Seniors: Rich or Poor, You’re Worth a LOT to Lawyers, Courts, and Service Agencies!

by Lonnie Brennan

It started out simply: a retired Boxford lawyer, Marvin Siegel, got along in years, and as he approached his 83rd year amongst his fellow men, he began to slip a bit, needing some help around the house. His family pitched in, and at one point, a service that provided checkups on the elderly would visit with Mr. Siegel and see to his needs.

As time went on, his needs increased and a family member related that it made sense for his youngest daughter, a lawyer like her dad, to move into the family home with her…

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From ND ILL Fed Ct–Changes to Rules re: filing of Answers and Motions to dimiss

MaryGSykes.com

Apparently a Mandatory Answer with a Motion to Dismiss is no longer required.

The Northern District of Illinois launched a Mandatory Initial Discovery Pilot (“MIDP”) on June 1, 2017.  The three-year pilot has now been in effect for 18 months, and the judges of the district have decided to modify it slightly.

During the first 18 months, the MIDP has required parties in civil cases to file answers to complaints even when they file a Rule 12(b)(6) motion to dismiss or similar motion.  Answers are not required if motions to dismiss assert jurisdictional or immunity defenses.  As you know, answers trigger the 30-day period for the exchange of MIDP responses.  The MIDP requires these early answers to ensure that MIDP responses are exchanged at the outset of the case.

Effective December 1, 2018, the MIDP will be amended to provide that answers are due under the time periods established by…

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From JP: Case Law on pro se litigants

MaryGSykes.com

this is for when you’re pro se and screw up a bit.

The courts should help you out, at least a bit.

Due process issue unique to pro se litigants is what role the Rules of Civil Procedure should play. The Rules attempt to define a fair method of procedure, but an unrepresented litigant kindly asks for exceptions because when applied the method of procedure needs to be learned. In effect, courts liberally interpret the Rules to the benefit of pro se litigants. As described above, this is supported by Rule 1, which states that courts should consider the goals of fairness, speed, and cost, and Rule 94, which allows the rules to be relaxed or dispensed with when necessary. Since the plaintiff is attempting proper procedure in good faith, I ask the court to grant this leave to file a proper objection found in prior judgment. However, the…

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From FB: Chicago’s Homan Ave Police station riddled with police violence and torture–demand it be shut down!

MaryGSykes.com

Documents disclosed in Guardian lawsuit reveal for first time how Chicago police used punches, baton blows and Tasers at the off-the-books interrogation site

‘I was struck with multiple blows with open and closed fist by two officers ... I felt my face start to swell and deform instantly.’
 ‘I was struck with multiple blows with open and closed fist by two officers … I felt my face start to swell and deform instantly.’ Illustration: Jan Diehm for the Guardian

Internal documents from the Chicago police department show that officers used physical force on at least 14 men already in custody at the warehouse known as Homan Square.

Police used punches, knee strikes, elbow strikes, slaps, wrist twists, baton blows and Tasers at Homan Square, according to documents released to the Guardian in the course of its transparency lawsuit about the warehouse. The…

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From NL: how do I write a summary judgment motion and what is that?

MaryGSykes.com

I have to tell you, most law school grads don’t know how to write one either, so if you are pro se, don’t fret this.

The stages of litigation, for your background info are this 1) file and prepare complaint; 2) draft up written discovery to your opponent(s) which will be interrogatories (fancy word for questions), requests for documents and requests to admit; 3) get back answers (if you don’t, you have to file a motion to compel and maybe a rule to show cause); 4)  depositions of fact witnesses (you will likely need a lawyer for this, get one cheap and limit his or her representation to just your depns); 5) experts.  hire a expert if needed or helpful.  they will produce a report.  your opponent will likely then get an expert.  if there are depositions, get a lawyer, just for those, you will likely not know how to…

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From JB: what about criminal complaints for Probate perps?

MaryGSykes.com

One common question I get, is why won’t the states attorneys, police, FBI, etc. do anything about the fact that the probate court system is a large criminal enterprise where the elderly or disabled are targeted for a paid up home, cars, bank accounts, etc.  Then they are guardianized, often without notice, service, they want to fight the gship, but they either get no attorney, or the attorney is tied into the system. Then the house is sold and everything is sold, and the elderly person is forced into a nursing home, drugged with psych drugs (which are illegal and not FDA approved for the elderly) and massive attorney’s fees, courtroom vendor fees (case managers, etc.) are charged against the estate.  When that is quickly depleted, then food and water is with held and the senior quickly perishes. The body is quickly cremated to destroy all trace of chemicals and…

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